Crawley woman joins Boob Crew to raise awareness of breast cancer

Kreena Dhiman from Crawley is just one of eight women who have been affected by breast cancer and now form part of Avon's newly created Boob Crew
Kreena Dhiman from Crawley is just one of eight women who have been affected by breast cancer and now form part of Avon's newly created Boob Crew

A Crawley woman is part of a new team who are raising awareness of the importance of checking for the signs and symptoms of breast cancer.

Eight women, including Kreena Dhiman, 38, are Avon’s newly created Boob Crew.

Kreena Dhiman from Crawley is just one of eight women who have been affected by breast cancer and now form part of Avon�s newly created Boob Crew

Kreena Dhiman from Crawley is just one of eight women who have been affected by breast cancer and now form part of Avon�s newly created Boob Crew

An Avon spokesman said: ‘By sharing their own stories, the Boob Crew hope to raise awareness of the importance of self-checking.

“Speaking first-hand about their own breast cancer journey and not knowing what to look for or even checking their boobs regularly, this amazing boob crew of women want to ensure that no woman is left in the dark about breast cancer, knows the signs and symptoms and knows where to go to get help.”

Kreena said: “I was pretty unaware when it came to the signs and symptoms of breast cancer.

“I finally went to the doctor with an inverted nipple which didn’t want to sort itself out.

“I now know this is can be a sign of breast cancer. I was diagnosed with grade 3, hormonally sensitive breast cancer in a matter of days.”

She underwent surgery, chemo and radiotherapy.

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She said: “Initially, I underwent a single mastectomy and full node clearance on my left side. From there I underwent IVF to freeze embryos in case chemotherapy stole my fertility.

“A couple of months after radiotherapy I was back in surgery and had my second breast removed and a reconstruction.

“My biggest fear was hair loss. The more it fell out, the more of a victim I became and the less I recognised the girl staring back at me in the mirror.”

She added: “I think saying you are ‘free from cancer’ is a really dangerous term to use. None of us know if we are free from it, or if we are somehow just keeping it at bay.

“If I manage to change someone who isn’t breast aware to check for abnormalities and potentially save a life then my work hasn’t been in vain. We need to make breast checking instinctive.”

For more information visit: www.coppafeel.org/avon/getting-to-know-your-boobs/