National Park sights inspire two accomplished artists

Artwork by Adele Gibson
Artwork by Adele Gibson
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Present and Connect – Contemporary Landscapes in Oil and Photography is a joint exhibition by two Sussex-based artists inspired by the landscape of the South Downs National Park.

The fascinating show opens on Saturday, November 8, at Horsham Museum and Art Gallery and runs until January 3 next year.

Adele Gibson works in oils, while Ruthien uses a camera.

The artwork in this exhibition stems from their experience of being present in the landscape and their deep connection with it.

Adele’s work is rooted in her experience of being mindfully aware in the landscape and the total absorption, peace and joy that it brings her. She makes studies outside in her sketchbook and then the finished paintings are completed in her studio. These can take several weeks to develop and start to take on a life of their own.

The image that emerges sometimes flows from a deeper visual memory and can also incorporate inspiration from classical music, including Mendelssohn and Elgar, and the work of contemporary poets like Wendell Berry. The works in this exhibition are painted using traditional techniques in oils, either on canvas or wooden panels.

After studying in Brighton, Ruthien has been a professional photographer for the past eight years. She creates textured collages of beauty, light and drama incorporating photography, silkscreen techniques, painting and cutting edge digital imagery. Ruthien works both in digital and analogue, mixing the contemporary with the traditional, the unorthodox with the conventional. The landscape studies presented in this exhibition form part of a portfolio that also includes traditional black and white photography, wildlife surrealism and folklore inspired image and text fantasy stories.

Adele and Ruthien hope that visitors will enjoy these images, bringing both a sense of calm and a deep and timeless connection with the Sussex landscape. Visit www.horshammuseum.org.

Contributed by Horsham Museum