“God Save The Queen” - A Step Back to the 1970s

0
Have your say

Recently the 1970s have gone from the ‘decade that taste forgot’ to a decade that made modern Britain.

It was the decade that saw trends and fashions formerly concentrated in London sweep across the country.

Rising living standards and aspirations in the wake of the ‘Swinging Sixties’ were brought in vivid colour (via television, for the first time) into people’s living rooms.

Horsham Museum’s new summer exhibition, “God Save The Queen” – A Step Back to the 1970s, explores this era in a light-hearted way.

If you were a child in the ’70s your memories might be of chopper bikes, board games, Star Wars, and great TV programmes―the stuff nostalgia is made of; if you were a teenager then your memories might feature some of the great bands of the era―from the glam rock of Marc Bolan and David Bowie to the heavy rock of Led Zeppelin or the Disco hits of Donna Summer and Baccara; whatever your age, you were unlikely to have escaped flared trousers, platform shoes or lengthening hair styles.

“God Save The Queen” – A Step Back to the 1970s explores the stuff of nostalgia, featuring original toys and games, albums, memorabilia and clothing from the ’70s, drawn from Horsham Museum’s collections.

Just as 2012 was the year of the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee, so the Queen celebrated her Silver Jubilee in 1977. Remind yourself of the sounds of that year as the exhibition also plays all the number 1 singles from 1977.

The local scene is also explored.

There were notable changes to Horsham during the 1970s; the growth in Gatwick airport generated a realisation that Horsham had to modernise if it wasn’t going to stagnate as Crawley grew.

This led to the creation of Horsham District Council, which put in place a number of building schemes including Swan Walk (opened in 1976).

“God Save The Queen” – A Step Back to the 1970s opens at Horsham Museum on June 26 and closes August 25, 2012.

For further information contact Jason Semmens, Curator.

Article contributed by Horsham Museum.